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Performance Review Rating Scale

KathieKathie ✭✭
edited July 2009 in Human Resources
I'm in the process of updating our performance review system, and would like to look at positive terms for our rating scale. For example, instead of saying "Needs Improvement" we could use "Opportunity for Development".

I really need help with the two extremes: Unacceptable and the highest that you can get (currently we use Substantially Exceeds Expectations).

What do you all use?

Thanks for your help,

Kathie

Comments

  • KathieKathie ✭✭
    I agree... Opportunity for Development does sound optional, but our managers don't like Needs Improvement. Especially for a person in a new position, they see it more as an opportunity to grow.

    But then on the other hand, if someone that has been in the position for a while needs improvement, I think it should be a requirement and not an optional.
  • Kathie wrote:
    Especially for a person in a new position, they see it more as an opportunity to grow. But then on the other hand, if someone that has been in the position for a while needs improvement, I think it should be a requirement and not an optional.

    A few companies ago, we addressed that by having the short text on the lowest rating read: "Too New/ Needs Improvement" with the full text delineating who could use the "Too New" entry (less than 3 mos in role).
  • Just my two cents but Opportunity for Development makes me think that the employee was doing well and a new job just opened up that will give him/her an opportunity to develop new skills.
  • Kathie wrote:
    I'm in the process of updating our performance review system, and would like to look at positive terms for our rating scale.

    My two cents as well, but if the employee is not meeting expectations, why use positive terms? This will make their performance appear better than it is. Your goal is for them to improve their performance, or create documentation of them underperforming, and I don't think that sugarcoating it is going to serve your purpose.
  • We use the following:

    Outstanding: Performance is exceptional in all areas. Performance is recognizable as being superior on a consistent basis.

    Exceeds Expectations: Results clearly exceed most position requirements. Performance is of high quality and is achieved on a consistent basis.

    Meets Expectations: Competent and dependable level of performance. Meets performance standards of the position.

    Needs Improvement: Performance is deficient in certain areas. Improvement is necessary.

    Unsatisfactory: Performance is significantly below standards. Results are unacceptable and immediate improvement is required.

    Needs improvement and Unsatisfactory both require a "performance improvement plan" to be written by the supervisor/manager and must be enacted. If improvement is not noted in the designated time frame it may it may lead to termination.

    Outstanding and exceeds expectations categories will qualify the employee for a higher % of pay increase.
  • KathieKathie ✭✭
    Thank you LLanham... I did end up tweaking your ratings and definitions to fit our needs.

    We did end up leaving the Needs Improvement and Unsatisfactory. As you all pointed out, why make it sound positive if it isn't, LOL.

    I have another question about scoring. We're using a 5 point scale (1-5) with a 10 point range (can use 1/2 numbers). I hate to admit that I'm this brain dead... so please forgive me, it's been a really long couple of weeks....

    If a 3 is right in the middle and kind of where most people will be because that is "meeting requirements" is that considered a 100%? And if so, what would a 5 be? On the other hand, If a 5 is 100%, then what is a 3?

    Am I making this too difficult?
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