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Employee's forgetting to punch in/out

edited February 2011 in Stupid Questions
I have a couple employee's that conveniently forget to punch in/out on a regular basis. I know they fudge their time in/out when asked just to get a few extra minutes of time. Does anyone have any suggestions that would deter them from doing this?
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Comments

  • Yeah.

    "It is your responsibility as an employee of PAY BY THE MINUTE, INC. to clock in/out when you start/stop work. If you "forget" to do so, you must notify your supervisor as soon as possible so that your work time is properly recorded. Changes/additions/deletions of punches may be performed ONLY by authorized supervisors. Failure to adhere to this company policy may result in disciplinary action up to, and including, termination."

    Then make sure that ONLY supervisors can do so.
  • Thanks, I do ask their supervisor but usually they had already left and most don't care much anyway so they just say the time the employee was supposed to get off (generally 3:30.) I thought there might be a creative way to punish them just enough so it's not worth doing it again. Like deduct $10 from their paycheck everytime they forget. :twisted: Thanks again!
  • We require both the employee and the supervisor to sign off on all timecards. Any adjustments or changes must be made and approved by the immediate supervisor.
    we give a warning to the employee for a 1st or second offense and if that does not work they are written up.
    After that their pay for the day in question is held until the supervisor gives proper documentation of time worked. It has never gotton to the point where we have had to actually withhold a days pay though...
  • Kristen wrote:
    Thanks, I do ask their supervisor but usually they had already left and most don't care much anyway so they just say the time the employee was supposed to get off (generally 3:30.) I thought there might be a creative way to punish them just enough so it's not worth doing it again. Like deduct $10 from their paycheck everytime they forget. :twisted: Thanks again!

    Well, you can't deduct from their pay, but I think you know that.

    Honestly, you need upper management to back you up in holding the supervisors responsible. If they won't, you're just spittin' in the wind. :(
  • I like the phrase "Conveniently forget to clock in"
    hahaha yes, we have people like that too. I'm sure most employers have their share of them.

    When our employees forget to punch in, then I conveniently "forget" to pay them. A majority of our people have direct deposit.
    These people will frantically come to me saying, How come I didnt get a full check this pay period, and i'll say, Lets take a look at your time report together. And that is when I hear a bunch of curses and such.
    Usually after short paying these people, and explaining the basis for the "error" then they suddenly remember. What is the point of having direct deposit if the employee continues to receive a live pay check?

    What amazes me, is that these "convenient forgetters" have been employed here for 10+ years, and still are developing early stages of dementia. sigh

    Chris Lindstrand, CPP
  • We also have employees "forget" to punch in and out. We deal with several different states and I swear the supervisor is not reliable on questioning wether or not the employee really worked X amount of hours the day the punch was missed. We take every time card each week and enter it in a spread sheet how many times they punched per week, and how many times they missed. This sheet goes to the OWNER and I promise you, as "little" as he is-you do not want this guy yelling at you!
  • I have a couple employee's that conveniently forget to punch in/out on a regular basis. I know they fudge their time in/out when asked just to get a few extra minutes of time.

    Intentionally falsifying a time card is fraud. Put up some security cameras to record who arrives when.
  • I have employees that conveniently "forget" to punch in also... I guess we all do, along with the supervisors that don't think they should have to waste their time actually managing their staff.

    One thing that I tried with a certain offender (and it wouldn't work with everyone) I made "Wanted Posters" with the employee's picture on it. It had "Dangerous Timesheet Criminal" at the top, and a description of the "crime", as well as what to do if this person was apprehended. I only put the poster on the employee's desk (turned upside down of course) so I don't think anyone else actually saw it, but I did threaten to put it up on the bulletin board should there be another occurence. The employee laughed and thought it was funny, but did get better about punching in on time.
  • I'm not sure what the difference is between a card system that shows when an employee arrived and left and when an employee clocked in or out - well, it might prevent missed punches, but all you know is when the employee arrived and left - not when the employee actually worked - some folks arrive early and have a cup of coffee with the crew before actually starting work. The clocking systems do not distinguish between hours at the worksite that are not working hours and hours that are working hours.

    I guess my question is why the employee is still working if the supervisor has left for the day. If overtime needs to be approved, then the employee has to have someone approve it.
  • If an employee is "forgetting" to clock in/out then I think that says something about his work ethics. If someone cannot remember something as simple and routine as that, I think there needs to be repercussions to this. Either they are trying to scam the company for a little more money or they need to learn how to manage the basic concepts of working. Good luck getting them to comply!
  • The HR manager did not actually know, so he picked some supervisor names more or less at random. The company president fired the first supervisor mentioned (without talking to the person) and put the next three supervisors mentioned on one workweek unpaid suspension.

    If that supervisor selected at random had not been an actual offender, I'm surprised there was not a wrongful discharged suit and possibly defamation of character.

    I think the HR manager should have been fired for 1) not knowing (if supposed to know) and 2) for the random fingering.
  • The HR manager did not actually know, so he picked some supervisor names more or less at random. The company president fired the first supervisor mentioned (without talking to the person) and put the next three supervisors mentioned on one workweek unpaid suspension.

    If that supervisor selected at random had not been an actual offender, I'm surprised there was not a wrongful discharged suit and possibly defamation of character.

    Well, this would NOT have been a wrongful termination under the law. The employer is legally allowed to make stupid decisions, as long as a specific law isn't violated.
    BTW, I only cite wiki if I've vetted it. :wink:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wrongful_dismissal

    And "defamation of character" would have been a stretch, as well.
    http://www.lawinfo.com/fuseaction/Clien ... oryid/1162
  • We are switching to a new T&A system soon (we're testing right now) and it IS going to hold managers accountable for doing their job!!! I am going to love it when it's up and running, but employees & managers are NOT happy about it... and they are not afraid to tell me how unhappy they are either. As David said
    Doing their job correctly took time and effort that the supervisors were not prepared to spend

    I realize that it's a big adjustment for managers - the problem is that we've held their hands for far too long!
  • Kathie wrote:
    We are switching to a new T&A system soon (we're testing right now) and it IS going to hold managers accountable for doing their job!!! I am going to love it when it's up and running, but employees & managers are NOT happy about it... and they are not afraid to tell me how unhappy they are either. As David said
    Doing their job correctly took time and effort that the supervisors were not prepared to spend

    I realize that it's a big adjustment for managers - the problem is that we've held their hands for far too long!


    How is your new system going to hold manager accountable for doing their job ?
    I have trouble getting them to approve timecards by the cut-off time and there are a lot of errors/omissions on the approved timecards.
  • mmartinmic wrote:
    How is your new system going to hold manager accountable for doing their job ? I have trouble getting them to approve timecards by the cut-off time and there are a lot of errors/omissions on the approved timecards.

    With the new system - the supervisor can't approve a timesheet if there are any exceptions - missing punches, early or late punches, employee working in different departments, PTO etc.

    I know - we'll still have the issue where the supervisor isn't available on the day that timesheets are due.... but we'd have that anyway not matter what system is used. And there may still be some errors -especially in the beginning, but I believe it's going help alot!

    How are you doing timesheets now? Is it a manual process?

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